Do's & Don'ts

This is the "Do's and Dont's" section. Below are some explanations and images that show what and what not to do on basic installs and more complicated installs. Please click on an image to blow it up bigger in a new window. The "do's" on this page reflect how we do our installations

DO

stripped jacket cat6 wire

We will start out simple. When cutting the outer sheathing off to expose the cat3, cat5 or cat6 4-pair wire etc, "Do" use the string inside to peel back the sheathing so that you don't cut into the 4-pair copper wires that is inside the outer sheathing and damage it.

DON'T

low voltage snips cutting cat6 wire

"Don't" cut the outer shielding and use that as your exposed wires ready for termination. Without using and pulling the string down, you risk cutting into the copper. To expose the 4-pair copper wires correctly, Cut and throw away portion of wires above where you made your first cut to get to the string.

DO

rj-45 plugs

When terminating a 8-conductor rj-45 modular plug (or any other kind of modular plug for that matter) "do" make sure that your outer sheathing or "jacket" is crimped inside of the plug. This helps Protect the copperwires from exposure to moisture, dust and damage to the plug itself.

DON'T

rj-45 plug terminated incorrect

"Don't" terminate the modular plug leaving the copper wires exposed like this. You risk damaging the copper wires that are inside and the termination may break easier inside the plug.

DO

cat5e jack

When terminating a jack "do" make sure that your colors are correct to the corresponding a/b wiring selections before walking away from your jack. Also, make sure your sheathing, or "jacket" is all the way up to the jack. This protects the copper wires inside and helps with the integrity of the cable by keeping all the wires inside together, making sure to maintain the twisting of the pairs inside, right onto the pin of the jack.

DON'T

cat5e jack

You can bare the wires out for voice jacks. Make sure you always maintain the twist of the wires. "Don't" ever do this for a data termination. You may run into problems with the cable passing a test, especially if you do not maintain the twisting. Never leave the dust cover off the jack when finished terminating. This secures the wires and protects them.

DO

surface mount for voice and data

"Do" label your voice and data locations at both user end and I.D.F. (intermediate distribution facility, ie: your data center) end with a label machine. In this picture, we would put the label inside of the clear window for protection, depending on what the customer requests.

DON'T

faceplate for data and phone

"Don't" use a pen or sharpie to label out your locations. This is tacky and is unprofessional. the only time you use a sharpie is when you write on your 66-block for your phone termination labels as seen below on the next image

DO

terminated 66 blocks

This image shows some 66-blocks that are terminated very nicely and are properly labeled with a small sharpie. "Do" label your 66-blocks.

DON'T

66 blocks for phone install

If your hanging a backboard in a data center, "Don't" use only screws. The backboard will never withstand the weight of Telecommunications equipment and/or if we have an earthquake

DO

toggle bolt in backboard

We "do" use "butterfly" toggle bolts and screws for a safe, effective way to install your backboard in any data center situation.

DON'T

ceiling grid, cat5e improper wiring, code faulty wiring

This is a big "no no." When running cable above the ceiling tiles or anywhere. "Don't" run cable over waterpipes, electrical conduit, or other pipes. To properly pass inspection, you must run your cable up above everything else not touching the ceiling tiles as well.

DO

j hooks

These aerial j-hooks are what you would use to properly secure most all low voltage wiring above the ceiling. This will support the cabling and should be placed every 4 to 6 feet. "Do" install these either along the wall or shoot ceiling grid wires into the ceiling to properly complete your cabling route.

DON'T

structy=ured cat5e and cat6 network wiring

When dressing your wiring into a patch panel "don't" dress it in so tight and close to the panel. Later, this will be difficult to troubleshoot should it need any.

DO

structured network wiring for cat5e and cat6

This a very proper example image of a great way to dress in your cabling to a patch panel. Notice how the wires are spaced out. This is a definant "do" for any cabling company if they know what they are doing and it makes a job simple for troubleshooting problems with cabling on a patch panel should they arise. 

DON'T

ca5e 12 port mini vertical patch panel with bracket

This is a personal preference. We "don't" like to use white cabling for data wiring. You should always stick to a coloring scheme unless a customer request is to use different colors. We, usually, use blue for data and white or grey for Voice.

DO

vertical mini patch panel, 66 block on backboard

Here you can see an example that we have in our gallery section of a very basic install. We have blue for data and white for voice. Notice the simplified map of the layout of locations for this office. It's a great reference to have to know what numbers of labels are where. Especially for your company's I.T. guy.

DON'T

data center disaster, server room , horrible wiring job

This picture is insanity at its best. "Don't" over cable your racks in your data center. The racks need to breath and stay cool in temperature. This is where you may need some overhead Ladder rack or tray above the racks. What a mess!! Can we say wire management please???

DO

before and after network wiring, network cabling fix, green patch cables, data center improvement

Here is a before and after image of patch cabling between racks. On the before picture you see a messy job of patch cables. The green cables are dressed with velcro. "Do" use velcro when you can and utilize your wire management wisely.

DON'T

water damaged cat5e and cat6 cabling, data center disaster

You "don't" want this happening in your data center. Think ahead of the game before deciding to run cabling across the ground. Cabling and water do not get along. All this needed was an above ground cabling tray

DO

patch panels, data rack, structured wiring

This is a rack that is in mid-construction. Notice there is plenty of room for more cabling to come into the rack through the sleeve coming through the ceiling. "Do" dress the cabling without any cablescrossing or "diving". The spaces will be filled with wire management for a completely organized rack in the end.